Tuesday, September 13, 2005

Long distance

So M-Girl got to talk to A-Girl and Big D for a little while last night. After that, she slept better than she had in weeks. Talking on the phone isn't as good as being in person but it's better than nothing.

A-Girl said she's having a really good time. She loves performing and thinks everyone is sooooo nice. She sounds good. The little bit that I can see her on the webcam, she looks good. I really miss her. I miss my husband too but we are at least able to IM and talk a little bit more. He stays up and talks to me while A-Girl sleeps and then I stay up to talk to him while A-Girl's at school in the mornings.

I can't wait to see them. I can't wait to see the show. It'll be nice to meet more of the people so I can put faces with names. Sometimes I feel like I have to pinch myself to make sure this isn't a dream. When A-Girl said she wanted to be an actress, Big D and I talked about the possibility that she'd be successful but we're nothing if not realistic. The fact that she's done as well as she has really blows me away sometimes. In truth, a part of me wonders whether we should put the breaks on but then I talk to her and she gushes about how much she's enjoying herself. And although she misses her friends and me and her sister, she seems to be handling it really well.

As adults, we know that there are trade-offs in pretty much every choice we make. If we decide to live in the Midwest, we know that we'll have to deal with the winters. If you choose to live in the city, you have to deal with traffic and lack of affordable parking. If you live in the suburbs, you have to get up with the roosters to get to work on time. You can't have everything. As kids, the choices aren't generally as monumental - if you choose Doritos for you snack, you can't have Fritos, too. If you wear a skirt on the coldest day of the year, you have to deal with your legs getting cold. Nothing earth shattering. But at the tender age of 7 1/2, A-Girl's had to learn that if you choose to be in show business, you may have to be away from your family and friends for months at a time. You have to work hard - harder than the adults in the show because the adults don't have to do 16 hours of school each week on top of the show schedule. What's so amazing is that she understands and accepts the choices she makes. She expresses her feelings - she misses everyone - but she doesn't complain. And that makes me really proud.

7 comments:

Cin said...

Happy Tuesday! Sounds like you have good reason to be proud of Abby.

Thanks for visiting my blog (your compliments put a big smile on my face). I look forward to hearing your thoughts on the book.

UsedtobeKeb said...

Abby sounds wonderful! I'm here from Michele

Sandra said...

Whenever I see child actors being interviewed I'm always boggled by how mature they seem. Maturity is probably a big part of being successful at an early age. It sure sounds like Abby is more mature than most 7-yr-olds. Every time you mention her age, I'm shocked all over again--I keep imagining her as an 11-yr-old. Glad she's enjoying it, what a rich experience this is for her.

(I like these word verification thingies--some of them make such interesting new words!)

catherine ryan said...

Wow. She seems mature and focused for her age. I've read about people who just knew what they wanted to do from a very early age, and they are always that focused.

MIM said...

Jeez. I'm proud of her, too!

E said...

What a bittersweet feeling that must be...you must be so proud, but you must also miss her terribly.

Sleeping Mommy said...

How exciting and heart-breaking at the same time. Of course I simply must know more about all of this. Here I go digging in your archives. :)